eNom New gTLD Infographic
Neustar Domain Names

eNom New gTLD Infographic

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I want to share this new gTLD infographic created by eNom. In an update earlier this week, the company reported that “eNom’s new TLD Watchlist reached 3.3 million expressions of interest,” which is a 30% increase since April.  As of right now, the top three new gTLD reservations at eNom are .web, .shop, and .hotel.

1 & 1, which is in the midst of a massive mainstream marketing campaign, is showing a bit more than 3.5 million gTLD pre-reservations, and the top 3 pre registered extensions are .web, .online, and .shop. Suffice to say, the winner of the .web and .shop applications are going to sell many domain names.

I find it a bit surprising that eNom is reporting 3.3 million pre-reservations while 1&1 is reporting 3.5 million because of the huge marketing campaign by 1&1. If I had to guess before looking at the reported numbers, 1&1 would have had far more pre reservations than eNom. I would imagine eNom’s significant preservation number is due to the prominent location of its new gTLD link in the top menu as well as its marketing efforts to customers.

Unfortunately, I was not able to download the eNom graphic as a .jpg or .gif file, so if you want to check it out, you’ll need to download it from eNom’s website.


About The Author: Elliot Silver is an Internet entrepreneur and publisher of DomainInvesting.com. Elliot is also the founder and President of Top Notch Domains, LLC, a company that has sold seven figures worth of domain names in the last five years. Please read the DomainInvesting.com Terms of Use page for additional information about the publisher, website comment policy, disclosures, and conflicts of interest.


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Comments (8)

    Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon)

    If I remember correctly eNom and their partner Fabulous.com made it very easy for people to preregister their existing domains in other TLDs, so that could potentially explain the high number.

    I wonder how much pickup eNom has from their resellers (and their customers in turn) for the pre-registrations. Do they also offer them on name.com?

    As pointed out to me recently by the developer of United Domains (US) one key factor when counting the pre-registrations is how they are done. Are those unique pre-registrations or could there be multiples. I.e. do they only allow one pre-order per domain or would they allow for more.

    October 26th, 2013 at 11:21 am

    gaetano marano

    too many new TLDs … only very few may succeed

    October 26th, 2013 at 12:19 pm

    Domenclature.com

    What prevents people from preregistering at both Registrars? Not necessarily in a duplicitous fashion, but just plain duplicity? The eager Pre-registrants could just be hedging their chances by doing at both loci. therefore, we cannot rule out that the total from both Registrars sums approximately 3MM; the onus is on the Registrars to prove otherwise.

    October 26th, 2013 at 3:15 pm

      Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon)

      @Domenclature: I meant within the registrar. Of course nothing can prevent people from preregistering at multiple registrars, unless there was an official centralized pre-order service, which there isn’t.

      And of course many of the generic words that were pre-ordered will be on the list of domains that the registry will try to sell at a premium, which will then again decimate the number of pre-registrations that will lead to actual registrations… and all the of services I saw were “non-binding”, so it all has to be taken with a grain of salt.

      United Domains has collected more than 1,4 million unique pre-registrations according to their site.

      In reply to Domenclature.com | October 26th, 2013 at 5:22 pm

      Domenclature.com

      “United Domains has collected more than 1,4 million unique pre-registrations according to their site”. – Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon)

      I don’t see how the Registrars’ claims could exclude the possibility, nay, the probability, that the lists with the lesser names, are a subset of the list with the most names.

      In reply to Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon) | October 26th, 2013 at 6:06 pm

      Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon)

      @Domenclature: Even though I don’t quote understand what you mean by “the lists with the lesser names, are a subset of the list with the most names” – the term “unique” indicates (and this has been confirmed to me by the team at United Domains) that they are only collecting one application per domain.

      In reply to Domenclature.com | November 6th, 2013 at 11:45 am

      Domenclature.com

      @Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon)

      Let’s use math to make it simpler:

      Assume for a moment that there are finite words that could be preregistered in a gTLD string: that is called the universal set A (with Registrar One).

      It’s a set that contains everything in, let’s use the extension .XYZ, with United Domains. So, in the following example, United Domains is Registrar One.

      Now, let’s assign 1and1 Registrar Two. Assume that they are both taking Pregistrations for .XYZ. The other integers (1,2,3,…n) are eager Pre-Registrants.
      [Note: The three dots … are called an ellipsis, and mean “continue on]

      When we define a set, if we take pieces of that set, we can form what is called a subset.

      So for example, we have the set {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. A subset of this is {1, 2, 3}. Another subset is {3, 4} or even another, {1}. However, {1, 6} is not a subset, since it contains an element (6) which is not in the parent set. In general:

      A is a subset of B if and only if every element of A is in B.

      So let’s use this definition in some examples.

      Is A a subset of B, where A = {1, 3, 4} and B = {1, 4, 3, 2}?

      1 is in A, and 1 is in B as well. (PreRegistrant applying in both Registrars).
      3 is in A and 3 is also in B.(PreRegistrant applying in both Registrars).
      4 is in A, and 4 is in B. (PreRegistrant applying in both Registrars).

      That’s all the elements of A, and every single one is in B;
      Yes, A is a subset of B

      Notice that 2 is in B, but 2 is not in A (Unique PreRegistrant).

      Note: Subsets does not necessarily have to be a proper subset.

      I hope that helps. I’m not saying this is the case, only that it is possible, even probable. People who hustle to register names first, are usually desperate in their quest.

      In reply to Frank Michlick (DomainCocoon) | November 6th, 2013 at 5:24 pm

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