Tip to Find a Domain Buyer | DomainInvesting.com

Tip to Find a Domain Buyer

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There have been a number of times where I’ve sold an end user buyer more than one domain name at different times. After completing one deal, I have a look around at various venues to see if there are other names in the same/similar vertical that could be acquired and flipped at a profit.

It’s a risk to buy names with the hopes of flipping to a specific person, but if you have a good gut feel and the name can be used by other parties, it can be worth the risk. I want to share a tip about how you can sell a name to someone based on a sale you saw (ie from Ron’s weekly sales report).

Have a look at the DNJournal sales report every week. Take some of the high value names that sold and perform a Whois search on the name. See who bought the name and try to find out as much information about the company as you can to determine why they bought the name and why they paid what they paid.

Once you figure this out, look at the buyer’s website and/or LinkedIn page to see what other products or services the company offers. Check out who owns the corresponding domain names (NOT trademark names, but descriptive types of names). If you can buy those names for a good deal, you can then present them to the buyer of the reported name from Ron’s report.

Here’s a made up example. Let’s say that XYZ Widgets & Devices spent six figures to buy eWidgets.com. After doing some research, you see that eDevices.com is for sale for low 4 figures (it is NOT). You can purchase that domain name and then offer it to the buyer of eWidgets.com at a good (but profitable) price. You already know the company values domain names and you know they just spend six figures on a different name.

Don’t forget these important factors:

  • Do not buy/offer trademark names
  • Make sure you contact the right person at the company (contact the seller for details)
  • Names should be salable to other parties if buyer isn’t interested
  • Don’t try to sell a name before you bought it

About The Author: Elliot Silver is an Internet entrepreneur and publisher of DomainInvesting.com. Elliot is also the founder and President of Top Notch Domains, LLC, a company that has sold seven figures worth of domain names in the last five years. Please read the DomainInvesting.com Terms of Use page for additional information about the publisher, website comment policy, disclosures, and conflicts of interest.


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Comments (28)

    Talk this way

    @Elliot… Its a great tips, i have sold few domains in the same fashion, but its not for sure that i will be interested to invest 4 figures hoping that Mr.x will buy for 6 figures … Truth be told many domainer are still broke until we are talking about Elliot ;)

    July 21st, 2012 at 1:24 pm

    RaTHead

    in the future the most valuable names will all be dotcoms in esperanto.

    July 21st, 2012 at 1:41 pm

    Poor Uncle

    Hi Elliot…

    No Wonder you are rich a man. hahaha

    Your example:

    eWidgets.com = $xxx,xxx (end user paid)
    eDevices.com = $x,xxx (Elliot acquisition cost)

    Sweet!

    July 21st, 2012 at 2:00 pm

      Elliot Silver

      @ Poor Uncle

      Doesn’t always work out in that manner, but good when it does :)

      July 21st, 2012 at 3:20 pm

    Leonard Britt

    Yes, finding individuals within companies who value domain names is not near as easy as finding companies who could use a domain name. The caution about targeting a company that has recently purchased a domain is that they just spent $$$ on that keyword and might not be in the mood to immediately buy another domain in that vertical. If you buy a new tv, computer or auto, what is your response to advertisers who try to sell you another?

    July 21st, 2012 at 2:53 pm

    Anunt

    Keep playing the domain game while it lasts…it’s slowly dying out.

    Selling to other domainers is very hard now.
    Before, you could easily sell to another domainer.

    Now you must sell to end users.. and this game is also going to slowly die out…

    Don’t get caught holding a bag full of smoke.

    I sold all my big value domains like locals.com, meetpeople.com, sari.com, sax.com, chica.com, etc…etc…etc…

    Now I only have about $50k worth of domains left…and don’t care too much if they sell or not.

    My advice…don’t risk buying any new domains until you get rid off your high value domains.

    The domain game is changing…be careful.

    Good Luck!!!

    July 21st, 2012 at 3:24 pm

    Elliot Silver

    @ Anunt

    Lots of people said that around 2000, too ;)

    Personally, I am buying when I see good opportunities.

    Things have been changing, but business is still pretty solid. I saw a slowdown in domain investor purchases in 2008-09 and it picked up in 2010 – early 2012. I think the economy has people conserving money, and that was a lesson learned during the 2008-09 recession.

    When the economy improves, people will buy again. I think there are people who believe that the domain investor slowdown is due to gTLDs, but I think it’s mostly related the economic reasons rather than a seismic shift in investing beliefs.

    July 21st, 2012 at 3:33 pm

    Anunt

    Check out Sedo, DnJournal, Afternic sales…

    Do a Whois lookup on top 5 domain sales each week…

    You will notice almost ALL buyers are end users…

    Domainers are still in the selling mode…

    Domainers are NOT buying names for $50k+ anymore…

    I agree the slow down is due to economic reasons and new gTLDs.

    July 21st, 2012 at 4:08 pm

    Elliot Silver

    @ Anunt

    Yes, the sales reports are a bit concerning, but I’ve only reported one sale this year – the $25k sale of Newburyport.com – and I know there are many sales closed in private like mine.

    While this month has been the slowest of the year for me (mostly because I was in Europe and not working really for almost two weeks), I already beat last year’s earnings/income and we’re only in the middle of July (last year was a great year even by my high standards).

    In my opinion, there’s more opportunity when others are running scared. There are fewer bidders/bids on the auctions I am involved with, there are fewer people trying to buy domain names from owners, and owners of great domain names feel the need to cash in and there are fewer buyers willing to buy domain names from them making their names more affordable. In 2006-07, I would be competing against 3-4 people when buying names in private, and there are fewer people doing what I do.

    It’s risky of course, but there is a lot of opportunity, and if you can make good buys now, you’ll make even better sales when the economy turns around.

    Again, yes, there is a level of concern, but it’s a bit alleviated when I look at my sales numbers and positions.

    July 21st, 2012 at 4:23 pm

    Louise

    @ Elliot said

    @ Anunt

    Lots of people said that around 2000, too

    Personally, I am buying when I see good opportunities.

    Things have been changing, but business is still pretty solid.
    . . .
    I already beat last year’s earnings/income and we’re only in the middle of July (last year was a great year even by my high standards).

    In my opinion, there’s more opportunity when others are running scared.

    Thanx for sharing your jewels of knowledge about your experience, highlighting optimism. How is Dogwalker doing? I am proud you developed some of your properties.

    July 21st, 2012 at 6:04 pm

      Elliot Silver

      @ Louise

      Thanks :)

      DogWalker.com is doing well… Somewhere between 400-500 advertisers still.

      July 21st, 2012 at 6:50 pm

    Branding Zen

    This is good consulting knowledge your sharing, it’s very much appreciated.

    I’m not sure about the .com’s in contemporary times, read my thoughts here http://alturl.com/gw4xs

    If the company were savvy enough they should search themselves, but that’s the beauty in life, we don’t all think alike.

    Whois is an important site in the detective work required in this method, good fun too.

    Thank Elliot, Howard.

    July 22nd, 2012 at 8:08 am

    Margie

    Elliot, thank you for the great idea. Information is power. I definitely want to share your ideas with my friends.

    July 22nd, 2012 at 10:58 am

    John

    Elliot
    How long is your average holding time on names?
    Do you hold any names longer than 1 year (ones you aren’t developing)?

    July 22nd, 2012 at 6:48 pm

    Elliot Silver

    @ John

    Sometimes – I would rather hold out for a better price and sometimes it’s not possible to get that right away.

    July 22nd, 2012 at 7:47 pm

    nidal kadri

    I had a great purchase today for only $20,000 – the domain OnlineSport.com was my target of purchase.
    my bid was in private and the domain was never used before. OnlineSport.com is appraised at $79,000

    July 22nd, 2012 at 7:54 pm

    Jeff Schneider

    Hello Elliot,

    Those who think the .com secondary market game is over are il informed to say the least.

    The secondary market in .COM extension hasn’t even cleared away 10% of the smoke screen that Google , Ad Marketers and Registrars and Domainers loaded with other extensions and others with agendas to hide the real values of Virtual Business Foundations awesome Strategic Marketing capabilities.

    Those who have already sold have jumped the gun and will miss the most historic price multiple explosion of any asset class in history 7/22/12

    Gratefully, Jeff Schneider (Contact Group) (Metal Tiger)

    July 22nd, 2012 at 8:01 pm

    Elliot Silver

    Jeff

    Thanks for your comment. What is “(Contact Group) (Metal Tiger)”?

    July 22nd, 2012 at 8:02 pm

    Jeff Schneider

    Its my Branding Handle.!

    I am a Gemini West Horoscope / Iam by birthright A Metal Tiger Eastern Horoscope Contact Group is a collective Mastermind Group I head up !

    If you do a Google search and punch in = Gratefully, Jeff Schneider (Contact Group) (Metal Tiger) completely see what you get?

    July 22nd, 2012 at 8:11 pm

      Elliot Silver

      @ Jeff

      I see blog comments, almost exclusively.

      July 22nd, 2012 at 8:12 pm

    Jeff Schneider

    Absolutely, I am proud of my truthfull CONTENT !

    I also have a partial background check on my BLOGGER profile Domainlair link on my site. I also have articles on E-zines and I am a Ghost Writer for many.

    Its partial though, the only person I entrusted with full disclosure is Rick Schwartz.

    July 22nd, 2012 at 8:38 pm

    NameConnect

    BAH! You just gave away a good one, I’ve actually used this one multiple times, last one I purchased a domain that was the singular to the plural he had already bought and sold it to the same guy off DNJournal for $5k more..it’s important to stay up on recent sales.

    I recently purchased GymnasticsEquipment.com, had a specific guy in mind and poof, with one sentence that idea was gone. I really only purchase sure bets, the others I broker ;)

    July 23rd, 2012 at 1:42 am

      Elliot Silver

      @ NC

      It may be a good one, but it’s more difficult for many to spend $x,xxx – $xx,xxx on a speculative purchase than for others.

      July 23rd, 2012 at 8:03 am

    luckysharms26

    I’ve been trying to sell domain names for a long time on GoDaddy but its garbage. I’m going to try selling my names using this method. Its just so upsetting when you see the lamest domain names have the highest bidders when one of mine like dirtymingle.com gets lost in the thousands that they have listed lol..and its even a ” featured” domain name!

    August 15th, 2012 at 11:41 am

      Elliot Silver

      Have you thought that maybe it’s the names and not the venue? What does “dirty mingle” even mean and why would someone want to buy it, especially at a premium price (over $10)?

      August 15th, 2012 at 12:05 pm

      Howard

      Luckysharm26 I would gently suggest to do some research into the GD auctions. It’s a science of sorts this game and not random theory.

      August 15th, 2012 at 12:18 pm

    Damon

    Jeff, you use a great deal of buzz words (which is fantastic) however you don’t actually explain what you are talking about, nor do you back it with any substantial evidence.

    Here, allow me to show you…

    The consolidation of Web 3.0 asset classes allows substantial increases in both wealth distribution and exposure, therefore alleviating the requirement for traditional procedural schematics that derive from mainstream advertising and service centric hubs.

    Jeff… com on bud.

    April 8th, 2013 at 11:24 pm

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