.NYC Registrations Passes .London | DomainInvesting.com
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.NYC Registrations Passes .London

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Because of my personal connection with New York City and the domain space, I have been paying closer attention to the .NYC domain name extension than other new gTLD extensions. I have been following along with .NYC since prior to the application process. According to today’s update at NTLDStats.com, it looks like there are now more .NYC domain names than .London domain names. As of this morning, there are 48,671 .NYC domain names, and there are 48,479 .London domain names.

.London had about a one month head start to sell its domain names to the general public. .NYC went on sale to the general public on October 8, 2014 and .London went on sale to the general public on September 9, 2014. Both TLDs have strong local support. Two weeks ago, the .NYC team at Neustar along with representatives from the Office of the Mayor of New York City rang the opening bell at the NYSE to celebrate the launch of .NYC domain names.

The populations of London and New York City seem to be similar, according to Wikipedia (8,416,535 million for London and 8,405,837 million for New York City). .NYC has nexus requirements that prohibit people without a New York City mailing address (non-PO Box) from registering .NYC domain names, and there are no nexus requirements for buying and owning .London domain names.

I would be a buyer of .NYC domain names if I could, but because of these nexus requirements, I can’t buy any for my company. Both of these extensions are on the top 10 list on NTLDStats.com.

.Berlin currently has the most registrations of the geographic new gTLD domain names at 153,710. It seems to have benefitted from a free domain name promotion that was offered earlier in the year. .Tokyo appears to be #4 on the geographic gTLD list with 25,794 registrations, and .Bayern is #5 right now with 23,575 registrations. I would predict that other geographic new gTLD domain names will also have strong showings.


About The Author: Elliot Silver is an Internet entrepreneur and publisher of DomainInvesting.com. Elliot is also the founder and President of Top Notch Domains, LLC, a company that has sold seven figures worth of domain names in the last five years. Please read the DomainInvesting.com Terms of Use page for additional information about the publisher, website comment policy, disclosures, and conflicts of interest.


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Comments (12)

    Elliot Silver

    I saw that a couple of others already posted about this earlier today, but I wrote my article before leaving for the airport early this AM and forgot to hit publish before going.

    November 3rd, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Konstantinos Zournas

    It doesn’t matter if others have published the same article.
    Different angles and maybe different audience.
    And we are not running a collective blog.

    Elliot, I must have more than 30 ready to post articles at the moment.
    A few as old as 3-4 weeks.
    Some days I write 10 articles then on others none.
    And I can’t publish 10 articles on a single day because most will be buried and read by no one.

    November 3rd, 2014 at 5:49 pm

      Elliot Silver

      I agree with you completely.

      I was heading off comments that occasionally pop up about posting an article after others have written about the news.

      In reply to Konstantinos Zournas | November 3rd, 2014 at 6:49 pm

      John

      No, don’t head them off, Elliot. I want to see you covering important and interesting stories regardless of who’s already covered it. Konstantinos is right about different angles. One could easily want to see the same topic as it plays out on more than one blog.

      In reply to Elliot Silver | November 3rd, 2014 at 10:05 pm

    Raider

    If we removed the number of defensive registrations, what do you think the numbers would reflect then?.. I wont hold my breath for an answer.

    “48,671 .NYC domain names, and there are 48,479 .London domain names”

    And the point is?

    “.Berlin currently has the most registrations of the geographic new gTLD domain names at 153,710.”

    If this means anything at all, perhaps I should have held onto my .Asia domains, A TLD that exceeds .Berlin by 124,00 registrations.

    Interesting that .info has 5,535,423 registrations and it’s one of the crappiest TLD’s in existance, what buyer today is going to pay big money for a dot info?, NOT even a domainer would, but yet it has over 5 Million regs.

    Like I said before, these numbers are meaningless and yet bloggers continue to post them for whatever reason, and by doing so they fool the domaining public into believing a gTLD is a hot item, when in reality it’s NOT.

    November 4th, 2014 at 12:48 am

      Konstantinos Zournas

      You are a bit confused.
      .Asia was introduced 7 years ago. How can you compare it with .berlin? And .nyc and .london?

      .Info is not one of the crappiest TLDs. I have sold over 100 .info for 4-figures or more. If .info is the crappiest I can’t wait to see what do you think about the others.

      Buyers pay MORE than domainers!!! Not the other way around.

      “what buyer today is going to pay big money for a dot info?”
      My buyers.

      In reply to Raider | November 4th, 2014 at 9:17 am

      Raider

      You think $1000-$9000 is big money? You sold 100 .info’s for 4 figures? or is that for each? you conveniently left that out.. Its easy for anyone to say they sold dot whatever for x amount, show me one recent .info sale to an end user in the 5 figure category, just one.

      And I didn’t suggest domainers pay more, what I suggested is domainers are the primary market for these crappy gTLD’s, aside from corporations protecting their brand.

      Again, If we removed the number of defensive registrations, what do you think the numbers would reflect then?.

      .

      In reply to Konstantinos Zournas | November 4th, 2014 at 2:13 pm

      Elliot Silver

      If you removed ALL defensive registrations from ALL registries, there would be a lot less registered domain names. I think there are many .com, .net, .org…etc defensive registrations, too.

      In reply to Raider | November 4th, 2014 at 2:19 pm

      Konstantinos Zournas

      I am sorry if $1000-$9000 times a 100 is pocket change to you.
      I didn’t know we have to only sell 6-figure domains to make money.

      Of course it was 4 (or 5)-figures each for a total of more than $330k.
      And I am sure I am forgetting some from my list.
      I will post my 100 sales and if you want you can challenge any one of them.

      Have you even looked at one new gtld zone file?

      You want 1 sale? Prostate.info $15,000.
      For other sales look here:
      http://www.dnjournal.com/ytd-sales-charts.htm
      Next time do your research.

      In reply to Raider | November 4th, 2014 at 2:31 pm

      Ray Redican Jr. (CIS)

      Interesting

      In reply to Konstantinos Zournas | October 5th, 2015 at 5:27 pm

    Arthur

    I believe we will see a complete washout of the domaining sector in the next 5 – 10 years. People who register all these extensions will drop them once a serious economic event occurs. Kind of like all the properties that got foreclosed on in the Great Depression. Its hard to understand why I go into all these generic words and see the .net taken, the .info taken, the .co taken etc…

    WITH NO BUSINESS MODEL on the property AND parking being what it is cannot surely offset the carrying costs.

    I have a portfolio of 40-50 names and see it as a hole in the head sometimes. Cannot imagine people who have multiples of that.

    Now,….this is not lump in everyone as some people DO make a living buying and selling and thus need inventory. I am referring more about the vast swaths of people who just have large portfolios…that must be expensive to carry.

    November 4th, 2014 at 2:40 pm

      Konstantinos Zournas

      @Arthur
      If you have 10,000 and sell domains worth $300k per year you make a profit, don’t you? It is simple as that.

      If you don’t make a profit then yes you have a problem.

      The BUSINESS MODEL is profit.

      In reply to Arthur | November 4th, 2014 at 6:22 pm

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