Tip When Emailing Domain Buyers to Sell Domain Names

Tip When Emailing Domain Buyers

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I want to share a tip with you that may help increase your email open rate when trying to sell domain names to end user and other buyers.

On a daily basis, I receive quite a few emails from people trying to sell me domain names. More often than not, I’ll have a look at the list and let the person know what I think (or at least whether or not I am interested in buying). One way to be sure that I won’t open an email or look at domain names that are for sale is to include an attachment or a link to a website in order to see what domain names are being sold.

There’s no way that I am going to risk the health of my computer (and security) by opening any type of document or file. It can be as innocuous as a simple text file, but I am not going to open it. Similarly, I am not going to visit a website I don’t recognize, especially if I don’t know the email sender. I assume many people are like me, and many companies have filters to automatically detect and delete emails that have certain types of files.

The average domain investor might have a couple or a few great domain names that are for sale. Some have more and many have less. That said, I would think most people can list their top 5 or so domain names in an email rather than asking the recipient to risk his security by opening a file or visiting an unknown website.

If you want to increase your chances of selling a domain name or a group of domain names, I strongly recommend that you include the names in the body of an email. Even if your email with attachment makes it through a filter, it’s very likely the recipient will simply delete it. Looking through a list of domain names from a random person isn’t worth risking the security of a computer.


About The Author: Elliot Silver is an Internet entrepreneur and publisher of DomainInvesting.com. Elliot is also the founder and President of Top Notch Domains, LLC, a company that has sold seven figures worth of domain names in the last five years. Please read the DomainInvesting.com Terms of Use page for additional information about the publisher, website comment policy, disclosures, and conflicts of interest.


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Comments (8)

    Kevin

    3 Tips For Super Securing Your PC
    (and being able to safely open attachments and links in your browser and email software)

    1. Disable JAVA in your browser. (It’s ok to have it on your system, just don’t browse with it enabled in your browser. You can enable as needed for any site requiring Java only that you trust. Though less and less sites are using Java now that it’s facilitated so many exploits.)

    2. Install the NoScript Add-On For Firefox. NoScript ROCKS! It’s another excellent layer of protection that prevents any script from loading as you surf the Net.

    3. Install WebRoot’s SecureAnywhere Software. This is the absolute strongest, best and most technologicall advanced security software out there.

    http://www.webroot.com/En_US/index.html

    You can also run SecureAnywhere on top of any other anti-virus, anti-malware, anti-spyware software you already have installed on your PC or you can uninstall the others and just use SecureAnywhere by itself as your main protection software.

    It installs in seconds, scans fast as lightning, runs with all the security updates continuous in real-time from the cloud, provides 100% complete protection from the nasty zero-day exploits and won’t allow anything external to come in and activate unless you authorize it.

    For secure email software try Mozilla’s Thunderbird.

    https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/

    It’s very robust and has great built-in advanced security features.

    April 5th, 2013 at 1:15 pm

      DoktorThomas™

      “This is the absolute strongest, best and most technologicall[y] advanced security software out there …”

      Nothing in cyberspace is absolute. Haven’t used WebRoot since 1990’s. Change based on failure. There is other software that is more specialized and superior (opinion supported by third party testing).

      To reveal your defensive tools on line is asking for penetration, or worse.

      April 7th, 2013 at 12:05 pm

    Darryl Lopes

    Very interesting article Elliot. Great insight on the topic. What are your thoughts on the email senders subject line? In order to have better response to open emails.

    April 5th, 2013 at 3:51 pm

    Michelline

    So that’s why I never heard from you!! I guess I need to remember that instead of thinking I didn’t want to flood an email with a list of domains to make it look cluttered and unprofessional!! I guess I will give it another go Elliot!
    Thanks for the tips!!
    Michelline

    April 5th, 2013 at 5:50 pm

    JP

    Very true but if you want to potential buyer to even see the domains if it is a long list then better to attach or send an email with a small sample first. Too many domains in an email = automatic spam folder unless you are sending with a service like comstant contact etc… Which is whitelisted by mcaffe norton, gmail, microsoft, etc….

    April 5th, 2013 at 10:20 pm

      Elliot Silver

      If a person can’t narrow down a list to a few domain names a potential buyer might like, he/she shouldn’t be emailing prospects. It’s an exercise in futility.

      April 5th, 2013 at 11:05 pm

    Cory L

    I definitely agree with the not having a site link or attachment, when I get an email from an unknown sender I pretty much ignore it or delete it. I’ve been using a template that I created that I have mixed feelings about and I would love to get some feedback.

    Subject: domain update

    To whom it may concern,
    We are liquidating part of our domain portfolio including ************.com. (domain details). If you are interested in aquiring this domain, email me at dn@DeliverDomains.com.

    Thank you,
    Cory L

    [any advice/feedback is appreciated

    April 6th, 2013 at 5:30 pm

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